El Bicentenario with Felipe Calderón – Zócalo, Mexico City


This post is part 2 of 4 in the series Mexican Bicentennial

We’ve just walked four miles (1.6 km) back to our hotel from the Zócalo in Mexico City where we were part of an awesome party to celebrate El Bicentenario (the bicentennial) of Mexico’s independence from Spain. There were beauty queens, explosions, acrobats, a parade, politicians, musical icons and tens of thousands of other revelers including Mexican President Felipe Calderón delivering the traditional ode to Miguel Hidalgo’s September 16, 1810 call to arms which sparked the Mexican War of Independence. It’s a speech  that’s delivered by the sitting President on the eve of every Mexican Independence Day.

From the balcony of the Presidential Palace, the sitting President repeats a cry of patriotism called the Grito Mexicano which is based on the Grito de Dolores. Then the President rings the bell of the National Palace on the Zócalo in Mexico City. Oh, then the crowd goes wild. Did we mention we were about 100 feet away from the President as he spoke?

Check it out in our video and photos, below.

Mexican President Felipe Calderón rings the bell on the balcony of the Presidential Palace and issues the Grito Mexicano as part of Mexico’s celebrations marking 200 years of independence from Spain.

Mexican President Felipe Calderón rings the bell on the balcony of the Presidential Palace and issues the Grito Mexicano as part of Mexico’s celebrations marking 200 years of independence from Spain.

Around 6:00 am on September 16, 1810, Hidalgo, a Roman Catholic priest, ordered the church bells to be rung and he gathered his congregation. He then addressed the people encouraging them to rise up with these words:

My children: a new dispensation comes to us today. Will you receive it? Will you free yourselves? Will you recover the lands stolen by three hundred years ago from your forefathers by the hated Spaniards? We must act at once… Will you defend your religion and your rights as true patriots? Long live our Lady of Guadalupe! Death to bad government! Death to the gachupines!

The English translation of the 2010 version of the grito, as delivered by President Calderón earlier tonight, goes like this:

Mexicans!

Long Live the Heroes that gave us our Fatherland!

Long Live Hidalgo!

Long Live Morelos!

Long Live Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez!

Long Live Allende!

Long Live Aldama and Matamoros!

Long Live National Independence!

Long Live the Independence Bicentennial!

Long Live the Centennial of the Revolution!

Long Live Mexico!

Long Live Mexico!

Long Live Mexico!


Read more about travel in Mexico


Series Navigation:<< Bicentennial Fireworks Over the Zócalo – Mexico City, MexicoBicentennial Build Up – Mexico City, Mexico >>

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8 comments on “El Bicentenario with Felipe Calderón – Zócalo, Mexico City

    • Thanks Andy. Getting the press passes that gave us access was no easy feat. After 3 weeks of runaround trying to sort it out, it was’t untill 4pm that we finally sorted it out. We had to do a Chinese firedrill in the middle of bumper to traffic so that Karen could drive back to the hotel while I sprited 2+ miles to the press office to pick up the passes…at 4:50, 10 miutes before the office closed. All good, no, GREAT in the end.

  1. Como quisiera star alli oh en General Teran oh en Monterrey!!! Amo a MEXICO un chingo!!! Vi los festajes live por Univision they were amazing!!! Congrats Mexico on 200yrs!!!

  2. I so envy you being there for the Grito! I was thinkingabout it all day yesterday (it was the 16th here in China) and wishing I was in Mexico instead. I am surprised by one thing though; earlier this year when I was in Dolores Hidalgo, I was told that Calderon was scheduled to give the Grito there this year, rather than in the D.F. Maybe he did it both places in the same day?

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