Rear View Mirror: Nicaragua Travel Tips After 177 Days in the Country


After traveling in Nicaragua for 177 days we’ve produced 24 blog posts about the country in which we’ve revealed our favorite city in Nicaragua, weighed in on the Big Corn Island vs. Little Corn Island rivalry, explored the beauty queen that is Granada, took the hippest cigar factory tour in the world and told you why you really should make it all the way up to the Northern Pacific Coast and out to Ometepe Island. In our final post about the country we present these Nicaragua travel tips from Central America.

Honduras-Nicaragua-borderNicaragua travel tips

Nicaragua  is definitely on our “go now” list. The country is making eco travel and adventure travel headlines, showing off a small but impressive crop of new luxury hotels that could hold their own anywhere in the world and producing some of the best rum in the world. It remains very, very affordable, it’s not yet over run by travelers and it’s one of the safest countries in Central America. Here we go.

Nicaragua for food lovers

Cold Toña Beer Nicaragua consistently served up the coldest beer we had in Central America and it seems to be a point of pride to only sever beer that’s truly bien fria. Sometimes the glass was frosty too and the refrigerators in most bars and stores had stickers on them promising beer under 0 degrees C (32 F). That’s noticeably colder than the norm in other neighboring countries.  Also, it’s practically unpatriotic to hike up the price of a cold Toña, the national beer of Nicaragua, so the price doesn’t vary by much (it’s a little more than US$1 for per liter) whether you buy it in the supermarket or at a fancy bar.

 

Nicaragua is not a foodie destination but two local dishes you’ll be grateful for are fritanga, usually served from basic street vendors and including a grilled meat, gallo pinto (spiced beans and rice) and a small salad. The best fritanga in the country, if you ask us, is found in the town of Masaya (below).

Fritanga in Masaya

Vigoron is another national dish which will please pork lovers with succulent pork cubes and chicharon (fried pork skin with some meat still on) served over cooked yucca slathered with a vinegary cabbage salad (below).

Gourmet Vigaron

Then there are street snacks like guiliras which are made with sweet corn masa cooked on a griddle between squares of banana leaves. They’re like a cross between a thick tortilla and corn bread and they taste great on their own or served “servicio” with a hunk of salty cheese called cuajada on top. Guiliras are not found everywhere. In fact, the only place we ever saw them was in Matagalpa, so snag ’em when you see ’em.

Award-winning Flor de Caña rum is proudly made in Nicaragua and is even cheaper in most stores than it is in the Duty Free shops at the borders, especially when it’s on sale which is often. The distillery is located just north of León and we recommend taking their fun and informative distillery tour.

Flor de Cana Run, Nicaragua

Nicaraguans are crazy about beets which turn up in salads all the time and are even used to tint and flavor white rice.

Driving in Nicaragua road trip tips

Nicaragua has far better roads than Costa Rica and most of their other Central American neighbors too thanks to serious petroleum contributions from fellow socialist country Venezuela (petroleum is a key ingredient in asphalt). There are still some dreadful stretches of road through small towns, so don’t get lulled into a false sense of smoothness.

Nicaraguans are also crazy about paving roads using interlocking cement bricks instead of black top. We suspect this has something to do with the fact that relatives of politicians own paving brick companies, but maybe that’s just us. Anyway, when done well, it’s a pleasure to drive on roads paved this way and if a pothole develops workers can just replace the broken/missing bricks by interlocking new ones in their place.

Pedestrians, pedi-cabs, horse-drawn carriages and cyclists rule the road and will not move for you even if you’re driving a great big pickup truck like ours.

You must have local liability insurance to drive in Nicaragua, but the best advice is to simply not have an accident. We were told that in Nicaragua if you have an accident in which blood is drawn you go to jail until the official fine is worked out and until a personal settlement (usually US$1,500 to US$3,000) is worked out with the victim and your liability insurance isn’t going to help you.

Nicaraguan drivers are very horn-happy, even by Central American standards.

We could get our truck washed for less than US$3 but finding a car wash with a pressurized water gun was difficult.

New, much stiffer traffic laws and fees are currently being considered.

Money, baseball and other random observations

The La Prensa newspaper, whose publisher was killed in 1978 after a long career of criticizing Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza, refers to Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega as “the unconstitutional President” almost every single time he is mentioned in print.

Speaking of Daniel, as the Nicaraguan president chummily refers to himself, his FSLN party recently got a re-branding at the hand of Rosario Murillo, the woman he secretly married then publicly married. Murillo, who is the government’s spokesperson and is with Ortega at nearly every appearance, is a fascinating character – like a cross between Stevie Nicks, a voodoo mistress and your long-lost crazy Latin aunt. Anyway, she thought the FSLN’s traditional black and red color scheme was too aggressive and in 2011 she swapped it for the color pink and tossed in peace signs and hearts for good measure. You will still see the random light pole or roadside rock sporting the old red and black bands, but most FSLN campaign message are now cheery and rosy, like the one below.

Daniel Ortega pink FSLN billboard

Baseball is huge in Nicaragua. It’s the official national sport (not soccer) and there are currently four Nicaraguans playing in the US Major Leagues. Extremely popular Sunday games are played as double headers but with only seven innings in each game as we learned when we caught a baseball game in Nicaragua.

Nicaragua versus Cuba National baseball teams

Though Nicaragua is the second poorest nation in the Americas (behind Haiti) we saw less evidence of homelessness, hunger, begging or shanties here than we did in Guatemala or Honduras.

You need to show your passport when you change money at banks, though there are official, regulated money changers on the streets who carry don’t require your passport and often give a slightly higher rate.

Electricity and water regularly cut out in Nicaragua. If you can’t work around that, make sure your hotel has a functioning power and water backup system. Many do.

1,000 córdoba bills from the Sandinista administration are out of circulation and worthless though “coyote” money changers may still try to give them to you.

Our ATM cards never worked at any ATM anywhere in Nicaragua.

Start getting your bearings by reading the Nicaragua Dispatch online English language news site even before you get here. It’s top-notch. And check out the Moon Handbooks Nicaragua Guide written by our friend Joshua Berman.

Here’s more about travel in Nicaragua

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!
[contextly_main_module]

Support us on Patreon





5 comments on “Rear View Mirror: Nicaragua Travel Tips After 177 Days in the Country

  1. Pingback: Head to Nicaragua Now, Before It’s Too Late!

  2. Debit cards do work at ATMs. You just have to try a different Bank. I was in Nicaragua in 2013 and quickly worked out at which bank my ATM debit card worked. I carried two cards and each only worked at different banks (something about the bank network they are associated with). One card was from a large bank and the other is from a smaller credit union.
    My family has been back recently and reported no problems with using ATMs.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge