Photo Essay: Carrera 13 Graffiti Street in Bogotá, Colombia

This post is part 4 of 5 in the series Street Art in the Americas

When shop owners in the Chapinero neighborhood of Bogotá, Colombia got sick and tired of cleaning tags and graffiti off their businesses, they mobilized. Instead of trying to ban street art (street art in Bogotá is legal within reasonable bounds), the shop keepers on Carrera 13 and the local mayor decided to run a contest to find talented street artists who would agree to create work on the closed shutters of the businesses, replacing the ugly defacement with art. The project began in 2014 and has turned Carrera 13 into an art gallery instead of an eyesore.

Carrera 13 street art in Bogotá, Colombia

Nearly 200 street artists entered the contest and 55 were ultimately chosen and given the go-ahead to work on the shutters, ultimately covering many, many blocks of Carrera 13. Here are some of our favorite pieces of street art on Carrera 13.

Toxicomano Gabriel Garcia Marquez Bogota Street Art

Artist: Toxicomano

Ciudad Alegre calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist: Ledania

Crisp Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist: Crisp

Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist: Surbeat

calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

Carsal Corrosivo Bogota Street Art

Artist: Carsal Corrosivo (just the bear)

Atomiko Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist (left): Atomico

ARK Animal Pura Calle Bogota Street Art

Artist: ARK

Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artists unknown to us

Fonso/Mal Bogota Street Art

Artists: Fonso/MAL crew

Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artist unknown to us

Calle 13 Bogota Street Art

Artists unknown to us

Bogotá street art travel tip

Because this street art is only visible when the businesses are closed, the best time to wander down Carrera 13 is early on a Sunday morning.

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3D Street Art Installations – Bogotá, Colombia

This post is part 4 of 5 in the series Street Art in the Americas

In addition to tags, murals, stencils, stickers, posters and wheatpaste street art in Bogotá (which we’ve already covered) you will find an array of 3D street art installations and sculptures. Here are some of our favorite examples of unconventional street art in Bogotá.

Street art sculptures Candalaria Bogota Colombia

Look up. There are a number of sculptures perched above the streets of Candelaria. We particularly like the banana fisherman (artist unknown to us).

Street art sculptures Candalaria Bogota Colombia

These distinctive ceramic masks are installed by Crisp.

MRtoll street art Bogota

Brooklyn-based painter and street artist MRtoll has been placing his clay sculptures of tropical birds around the city.

City ofRonzo street art Bogota Colombia

Ronzo is a German who lives in London and is known for his gap-toothed monsters. This “City of Ronzo” crest, located in the Candelaria neighborhood of Bogotá, can also be found in a few other cities including London.

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The Political Power of Street Art – Bogotá, Colombia

This post is part 3 of 5 in the series Street Art in the Americas

Street art is often a form of protest and social commentary. Bogotá, Colombia–where  the political power of street art plays out around recurring themes of social injustice, anti-capitalism and war and peace–is no exception.

Crisp Paz Bogota street art

Peace is a recurring theme in the politically charged street art in Bogotá. This piece, called Paz (Peace) is by Crisp.

War, peace and the “disappeared” in Bogotá street art

Colombia is (slowly) emerging from more than 50 years of ongoing violence, armed conflict and civil war, but the damage has been done. According to the New York Times more than 220,000 people have been killed and more than 40,000 have simply disappeared. The country is ranked #1 in the world in terms of  “internally displaced persons” because it’s estimated that nearly six million Colombian citizens have fled their homes and moved to other areas of the country to escape violence. According to the UNHCR, Sudan has half that many internally displaced persons.

It should surprise no one that street artists often articulate a rage about the high cost of war and the slow search for peace (the Colombian government and FARC rebels have been in peace talks for nearly four years) that is shared by many.

Memoria street art Bogota

Memoria (Memory), a massive multi-wall work created primarily by ARK, Chirrete Golden, is a seething ode to those killed, disappeared and displaced by a half century of conflict in Colombia.

The Memoria work, above, is even more poignant because it’s located across the street from the Centro de Memoria, Paz y Reconciliation. Opened in 2012, the Center of Memory, Peace and Reconciliation was designed to create a space where the violence and loss of the past could be recognized and honored in a way that allowed everyone to move forward to peace without forgetting the human cost of war. Thousands of test tubes of earth from massacre sites around Colombia were installed in an abandoned section of a cemetery which itself is a charged site to begin with because it’s where victims of the revolt of June 9, 1948, regarded as the beginning of decades of violence in Colombia, were taken.

Toxicomano desplazamento Bogota street art

This piece by Toxicomano is called Desplazamento (Displacement) and is a reminder of the millions of Colombian citizens who have left their homes and migrated elsewhere in the country in order to escape violence. No other country has more “internally displaced” people than Colombia.

EZLN guerillas victims of war Bogota street art

Even if the years-long peace talks between the Colombian government and FARC rebels results in a lasting peace deal there will still be EZLN guerillas in Colombia, as depicted here (artists unknown to us).

Guache ppeace is ours Bogota street art

This massive piece by Guache sums it up as an indigenous Colombian woman holds doves under the slogan La Paz is Nuestra (Peace is Ours).

Greed and inequality in Bogotá street art

Social injustice and the divide between “haves” and “have nots” is profound in Colombia and that’s rich fodder for Bogotá’s politically minded street artists.

Lesivo Bogota Street art

War, greed and capitalism are common stomping grounds for Lesivo as in this piece which includes a tip of the hat to the US backed Plan Colombia anti-war and anti-drug initiative that has led to the murder and disappearance of many Colombians.

Saga & Crudo Bogota street art

The duo Saga & Crudo decry capitalism by showing the Monopoly Man being held up by their own creations. Don’t miss the pooch getting screwed on the right.

Peace & Inequality Bogota Street art

Peace and inequality depicted in street art in Bogotá (artists unknown to us).

DjLu El Calidoso Bogota street art

DJ Lu often includes “El Calidoso” (on the right), a homeless man who was burned alive in Colombia, in his work.

Assange Crisp Bogota street art

Global politics are often tackled as well, as in this piece by Crisp which depicts Julian Assange. It reads “Where is freedom of expression?”

Environmental street art in Bogotá

Mining and oil extraction form a large part of Colombia’s GDP and there’s growing discontent about environmental threats and policies in the country. Many of those complaints and fears play out on the streets.

Top Toxicomano - Mining and the environment Middle DjLu - Fossil Fuel. DjLu details - oil is death & warbugs

Top: Toxicomano makes a case against mining in Colombia. Middle: DJ Lu on fossil fuel. Bottom: DJ Lu again on oil, death (note the man hanging from an oil well) and war bugs.

bullfighting Bogota street art

The previous mayor wanted to outlaw bullfighting and this piece, artist unknown to us, takes up the animal rights position by marrying the bull fighter and the bull.

Lesivo Bogota street art

This piece by Lesivo gets at the importance of a clean environment and healthy food.

Speaking of street art and politics…

Street art, within certain bounds, is legal in Bogotá, but not everyone is on board. The city’s newly elected mayor is making rumblings about a street art crackdown that have street artists clenching their butt cheeks and reaching for their spray paint. Stay tuned.

If you want to learn more about the artists, check our post about the overall street art scene in Bogotá.

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Bogotá Street Art 101 – Bogotá, Colombia

This post is part 2 of 5 in the series Street Art in the Americas

Most major cities around the world have some sort of a street art scene – not just random graffiti tags, but crafted pieces of art that happen to exist outdoors in public spaces. In Bogotá, the street art scene is on fire. Colombian artists have been invited to create street art around the world and participate in major gallery exhibitions and the vibrant art on display around the country’s capital (one estimate puts the total number of major works of street art in the city at more than 5,000) runs the gamut from playful to political to the sort of public art that defies pigeonholing. We really got into the street art in Bogotá as you can see in the 49 images in this post (the most we’ve ever included in a single post). We think our Bogotá Street Art 101 primer will get you hooked too.

rana frog Bogota street art

This friendly frog, artist unknown, welcomes you to the world of street art in Bogotá!

Bogotá street art, from maligned to mainstream

Street art wasn’t always a legit part of the city’s landscape. Despite the fact that major Colombian companies like Bogtoa Beer Company were commissioning street artists to create original artwork and logos for them (like the image below), the public and the police were not quite as enthusiastic about the emerging subculture.

BBC Bogota Beer Company uses street artists design truck

This logo, created by street artists, was commissioned by Bogotá Beer Company.

In 2011, young graffiti artist Diego Felipe Becerra was shot in the back by police while painting. Police then tried to say the artist was shot in self-defense while he was trying to rob a bus. Tensions rose (even the United Nations condemned the farce) and a forum was created to bring street artists and law enforcement officials together to figure out a way to coexist. Today, street art is legal in Bogotá where city officials and artists don’t just co-exist, they collaborate.

Bogota Street artist Zokos wins competition to paint this wall

In 2014, artist Ricardo Zokos won the annual street art competition put on by the city of Bogotá and he was given this wall and the materials needed to create this massive work of art.

Every year the city of Bogotá holds a street art competition and the winner is granted a massive space and the materials needed to turn it into a canvas for his or her vision. The winner in 2014 was an artists named Ricardo Zokos who used a cherry picker and gallons and gallons of paint to create the work above. It’s 75 feet (22 meters) high by 130 feet (40 meters) wide.

W hotel Bogota lounge designed by street artists

The street artists that work as Vertigo Graffiti were hired to create this wall in the bar of the W Hotel in Bogotá.

When the W Hotel opened in Bogotá 2015,  they got on the street art bandwagon too, commissioning  the artists at Vertigo Graffiti to paint an entire wall in the hotel bar. Over the course of two full nights of work, Vertigo artists Zas, Ospen, Cazdos, Ecksuno, DexS and Fish created the mural, above, for the hotel.

Bogota street art incorporated into apartment building

Normal, every day buildings like apartments and hostels in Bogotá routinely incorporate the work of street artists.

How to see the street art: graffiti tours in Bogotá

Love it or hate it, these days the street art scene in Bogotá is an integral part of the city. As the usual “but is it art?” debate rages, more and more guided tours of the city’s street art are being offered. After a visit to the city’s excellent Gold Museum, taking a graffiti tour is probably the second most popular activity in the capital. We took two different Bogotá street art tours.

Crisp Bogota Street Art

An Australian street artist known as Crisp lives in Bogotá, creates this art and stared the city’s very first guided graffiti tour.

The Bogotá Graffiti Tour was the first street art tour offered in the city. It was created by Australian artist Christian Peterson, who now lives in Bogota where he signs his street art as Crisp. His company still takes people on 2. 5 hour guided walking tours past fantastic examples of the city’s street art (free, but donations are aggressively encouraged). Tours are lead by English speaking guides who are graffiti artists themselves, including Crisp. It provides a good overview of the main players and main motivators behind street art found in the La Candelaria neighborhood of Bogotá, which is the area where the city was originally founded and is now hipster central.

Bogota street artist Koch1no

Veteran Bogotá street artist David Niño (aka Koch1no) guided us around some of the city’s best works. Here he’s standing in front of one of his own pieces. He calls the little character in the lower right hand corner of the work a “space bunny” and it appears in all of his pieces.

We also took a tour organized by tour company called 5 Bogotá. The tour was lead by Colombian artist Koch1no  (aka David Niño) and we departed from a shop called Visaje Graffiti Colombia which was opened to showcase and sell items designed by city artists. For a few hours Koch1no, who’s been doing street art for more than a decade, lead us through various areas of the city expertly and enthusiastically explaining the work we were walking past including who made the art, what it was meant to represent, what the inspiration was and more. It was a fun and informative tour and we were sorry to see it end.

The tour company no longer offers that exact tour but they’re about to launch a brand new graffiti experience. For US$35 per person, guests will be taken to the A Tres Manos studio where artists will help them create their own piece of art (all materials provided). That tour will be available to book through 5 Bogotá starting on April 1, 2016.

Bogotá street art: DJ Lu

This Colombian artist, who is also a trained architect and a professor, has been decorating the city since 2004. You can’t swing a cat in the capital without hitting one of his pieces which is often signed as Juegasiempre. He often uses stencils made from photographs of homeless people, including Marco Tulio Sevillano, a homeless man who was burned to death. Keep a keen eye out for other DJ Lu iconography including pineapples as hand grenades, dollar signs incorporating guns, and insects as weapons.

DjLu + Pez (Barcelona) Bogota Street Art

A classic piece from DJ Lu.


A classic piece from DJ Lu.

DjLu + Toxicomano Bogota Street Art

This piece is a collaboration between DJ Lu and the Toxicomano collective which contributed the woman with camera imagery on the left.

DjLu + Pez (Barcelona) Bogota Street Art

This piece is a collaboration between DJ Lu ad Pez, a Spanish artist now living in Bogotá, who contributed the funky flyers.

Bogotá street art: Bastardilla

Bastardilla is one of the most prominent female street artists in Bogotá, but there’s still not a lot of information out there about the secretive painter. What is clear is her focus on women’s rights, the struggle to end violence against women and the need for increased respect for the crucial role women and women’s work play in the future of Latin America. She reportedly sometimes sends her work with friends when they travel abroad and asks them to paste her art up in cities around the world.  Plus, she’s got one of the coolest names out there.

Bastardia + Gris One Bogota street art

Bastardilla did this work with Gris One. The bird in the middle is hers.

Bastardilla female graffiti artist Bogota street art

This is a piece done by Bastardilla.

BastardillAa Bogota street art

Another piece by Bastardilla.

Bogotá street art: Toxicomano

Work signed by Toxicomano is produced by a prolific collection of artists. The most distinctive style of their work is done in stencil and involves a lot of black and white and often features a mohawk-sporting character named Eddie, though other styles emerge like the blue pig decorated with a map of the world, below. The work of this collective is extremely popular and more and more businesses are commissioning Toxicomano to decorate their shops.

Toxicomano Callerjo Bogota street art lost boy Eddie

Classic work from a collection of artists known as Toxicomano involves a graphic, stenciled, largely black and white look and the face of Eddie.

Toxicomano Callerjo Bogota street

The Toxicomano collective of artists is often commissioned to decorate businesses in Bogotá, like this tattoo shop.

Toxicomano Callejero Bogota street art pig map

We love this Toxicomano pig decorated with a map of the world.

Bogotá street art: Lesivo

Lesivo, aka Diego Chavez, also frequently works on large murals with DJ Lu and Toxicomano. His work is marked by a startled, skull-like quality to faces and heads that smacks of suddenly shattered innocence.

Lesivo Bogota street art

Street art by Lesivo in Bogotá, Colombia.

Lesivo Bogota street art

Street art by Lesivo in Bogotá, Colombia.

Bogotá street art: Ledania

Ledania is based in Bogotá where she creates distinctive work with bold colors and complex graphics around themes that have been called mythological.

Ledania Bogota Street art

Colombian street artist Ledania transformed this wall with her fantastical style.

Lediana Bogota Street art

This is a good example of the bold colors and graphics that form part of Ledania’s style.

Bogotá street art: Guache

This Colombian artist, who has exhibited his work across Europe, returns to homegrown imagery of the plants, animals and indigenous cultures of Colombia. No color is too bright and Guache’s work is a technicolor celebration of Colombia’s heart and soul and a wake up call about the threats they face.

Guache Bogota Street art

The doves in this work by Guache are holding banners that read Social Justice and Freedom and Peace.

Guache Bogota Street art

Another mesmerizing piece by Guache.

Bogotá street art: Stinkfish

Stinkfish is possibly the most internationally well-known Colombian street artist at the moment with canvases selling in galleries around the world for thousands of dollars. His art is marked by stencils he makes of faces from photographs he finds or takes himself. He then elaborates on the images with graphics and intense colors. In addition to his solo work, Stinkfish has an art crew called APC (Animal Poder Cultura/Animal Power Culture).

Stinkfish Bogota street art

You really can’t miss a Stinkfish face.

Stinkfish + APC Bogota street art

Here’s a work by Stinkfish working with his APC crew.

Bogotá street art: Lik Mi

In addition to creating a body-centric street art style, the artist known as Lik Mi is also a jewelry designer. She’s said her fully nude paste ups are meant to counter the objectification of women and confront taboos about nudity.

Lik Mi Bogota street art

These three pieces by Lik Mi give you a good sense of her focus on confronting taboos about nudity and making a point about the objectification of women.

Bogotá street art: Saga

Saga‘s solo work is marked by joyfully absurd oversize women and an olde timey dude who’s seriously creepy. Sometimes the artist works with another artist known as Crudo who adds distinctive lettering, giving the collaborative work a vaudeville poster look and feel.

Saga Uno Bogota street art

The joyful absurdity of work by Saga.

Saga Uno Bogota street art

This creepy but compelling character is courtesy of Saga.

Saga & Crudo Bogota street art

Artists Saga and Crudo often team up in Bogotá.

Bogotá street art: Rodez

Rodez is a book publisher and street artist in his 50s and his work has a polished, gallery-ready look and feel. He is quite literally a father to street art. His sons, Nomada and Malegria, have followed him into the biz and they sometimes collaborate.

Rodez Street art Bogota

A whimsical, sophisticated piece by Rodez.

Bogotá street art: beyond the big names

Not everyone in the Bogotá street art scene is a star. Yet. Here are some pieces we liked by artists we know little or nothing about (if you know who did the pieces we can’t id, let us know in the comments section at the end of this post).

el beso de los invisibles The kiss MDC crew Yurika Jade

Based on a photo of a homeless couple kissing, this 115 high piece, called “El Beso de los Invisibles” (The Kiss of the Invisibles) was created by a co-ed team including Vertigo, Jade, Zas and MDC.

Katze + Carsal Corrosivo Bogota Sterrt Art

This work was created by Katze and Carsal Corrosivo.

MAL crew Bogota street art

MAL Crew did this work.

Carlos Trilleras Bogota street art

This wonderful portrait of a Kuna woman was done by Carlos Trilleras.

Bogota street art

Artist unknown.

Praxis Bogota street art

An Argentinean artist known as Praxis did this.

Entes y Pesimo Bogota street art

Peruvian artists Entes y Pesimo work together. This wall was done by Entes alongside the image below which was painted by Pesimo.

Entes y Pesimo Bogota street art

Peruvian artists Entes y Pesimo work together. This wall was done by Pesimo alongside the wall above which was painted by Entes.

Monstrucation Bogota street art

This piece is called Monstrucation but we don’t know who created it.

BLN bike Perversa Bogota street art

The bike image on the left was done by an artist from Ecuador known as BLN Bike and the googly-eyed purple blob was done by an artist known as Perversa.

Bogota street art

Artist unknown.

Bogota street art

Artist unknown.

indiginous Bogota street art

Artist unknown.

The ever-changing nature of Bogotá street art

One of the things that makes street art interesting is the ever-changing nature of the installations. The composite image, below, shows a wall outside the Visaje Graffiti Colombia store in Bogotá which we photographed on August 30, 2014 (top) and again on September 1, 2015 (bottom). What a difference a year (and some talent and some paint) makes.

Visaje gallery Bogota street art

Never enough street art

For more about street art, check out the Google Culture Institute Street Art Project and watch the trailer for a graffiti documentary called Este Territorio es Nuestro (This Territory is Ours).


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Best of the Trans-Americas Journey 2015 – Best Adventures & Activities

This post is part 1 of 4 in the series Best of 2015

Welcome to Part 1 in our Best of the Trans-Americas Journey 2015 series of posts. Part 1 is all about the Best Adventures & Activities of the past year of travel on our little road trip through the Americas including cruising the Amazon River in Peru (in luxury and in a hammock), playing with gunpowder in a bar in Colombia and sky biking through the treetops in Ecuador (don’t miss our Amazon drone footage). Part 2 covers the Best Food & Beverages of 2015, Part 3 covers the Best Hotels of the year and Part 4 tells you all about our Travel Gear of the Year.

In 2015, the Trans-Americas Journey explored Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and we drove 7,210 miles (11,603 km) doing it. Want more geeky road trip numbers like how much money we’ve spent on gas and how many borders we’ve driven over? Check out the Trip Facts & Figures page on our website.

And now, in no particular order, here are the…

10 Best Adventures & Activities of 2015


Best walk through the tree tops: It’s more than a third of a mile (500 meters) long and up to 115 feet (35 meters) above the ground. It sways and creaks as it connects more than a dozen different platforms. It’s supported by enormous rain forest trees and there’s nothing else like it in the Peruvian Amazon basin. We’re talking about the Ceiba Tops Canopy Walkway at Explorama Lodge from which you can see toucans, tree frogs, monkeys and more all at eye level. Check out our Amazon drone footage from above the Canopy Walkway, above.


Caceria del Zorro horse race - Ibarra, Ecuador

Best insane horse race: Every October the town of Ibarra in northern Ecuador hosts a race that includes hundreds of horses and riders who parade around town, then leap down a series of steep cliffs (see above) before taking part in a track race in pursuit of a rider dressed as Zorro. Yes, that Zorro. It is breathtaking in more ways than one. Learn more about the annual Caceria del Zorro in our story about Ecuador’s craziest horse race for Afar.



Best cock sighting: The national bird of Peru is called the Cock of the Rock. It is a crazy looking thing, but not how you’re thinking (check it out, above). It’s also pretty rare and seeing one is not a guarantee. Seeing five in one day without a guide is pretty extraordinary, but that’s exactly what happened when we hiked the trail to the Gocta Waterfall in northern Peru. Just after reaching the 4km mark on the 5km trail we heard a really weird noise–like alien frogs. We stopped and looked around and soon saw a bright red flash in the rain forest. We hung around and looked and listened some more and then we saw three male Cock of the Rocks in the same tree just off the trail. They hung around for more than five minutes before flying off. On our way back out we saw another Cock of the Rock alone in a tree around the 3km trail marker. Our advice is to keep your eyes and your ears open on this trail. And even if you don’t see any Cock of the Rocks the waterfall is worth is. At 2,530 feet (771 meters) Gocta Waterfall is one of the tallest free-falling waterfalls in the world.


Amazon Ferry Iquitos Peru Hammock

Best bare bones Amazon River trip: At an average up river speed of less than 10 miles (15 km) per hour, it takes more than three days to travel up the Amazon River by cargo ferry from Iquitos to Yurimaguas, Peru (you can hack off a day or so going downstream in the other direction). We slept on the deck in hammocks (Karen is demonstrating, above), spent a lot of hours spotting blue and yellow macaws and pink river dolphins with our binoculars and generally slowed down to river time. It was like taking a multi-day trip on the Mississippi but with rarer wildlife.


Aria Amazon river boat - Iquitos, Peru

Best super luxe Amazon River trip: On the extreme other end of the Peruvian Amazon River Trip experience scale you will find the Aria Amazon river boat. This floating luxury hotel and fine dining restaurant lived up to the substantial hype with some of the best food we’ve had in Peru so far (the menu was created by Executive Chef Pedro Miguel Schiaffino who runs the award-winning Malabar restaurant in Lima), exceptional service, chic rooms with floor to ceiling windows, great guides and, of course, all that Amazon. Did we mention the air conditioning and the hot tub?


Playin Tejo - Salento, Colombia

Best explosive bar game: It’s called tejo and it involves a heavy metal disc (called a tejo) which you toss underhand toward an angled board covered in wet clay. Your goal is to hit pieces of paper stuffed with gun powder which are arranged around a metal ring pressed into the clay. You know you’re doing it right when the reaction between your tossed tejo, the gun powder and the metal ring causes an explosion. We played it in the otherwise tranquil mountain town of Salento, Colombia at the Los Amigos bar where they have a massive open air tejo area set up in the back. Pay 1,000 COP (about US$0.40) per person, grab a cold beer for 3,000 COP (about US$1.00), choose one of the half dozen or so tejo set ups and start tossing. You earn one point for the tejo which lands closest to ring. You get three points for an explosion. You get six points for landing in the center of the metal ring and causing an explosion. You get nine points for landing in center of metal ring without causing an explosion. The first person who racks up 25 points first wins. Though Karen hates loud noises, she somehow won anyway. Check out her winning form, above.


Masphi Eco Lodge sky baike jungle canopy

Best place to bicycle through the air: Masphi Eco Lodge in Ecuador is remarkable for a number of reasons, including top luxury deep in the rain forest and breathtaking architecture. Mashpi is also home to the only sky bike in the country. What is a sky bike? It’s an ingenious contraption that allows you to pedal your way across a taught line high above the ground (above). Think of it as horizontal zip lining on a bike. At Mashpi they’ve installed their sky bike through a particularly lovely patch of cloud forest and a leisurely round trip between two platforms gives sky bikers eye level views of the tree tops and the flowers and critters that live there.



Best death road: There are two ways to travel between Macoa to Pasto in Colombia: via a normal highway or via something called the Trampoline of Death. Guess which one we chose…To assuage her nerves, Karen crushed the pre-drive to do list. Water bottles were filled. Tire pressure was checked. The oil level was monitored. We were ready for the steep grades, blind corners, narrow stretches where two vehicles can’t possibly pass, potholes, rock slides and whatever else something called the Trampoline of Death might have in store. What we weren’t ready for was a recently graded surface, helpful safety signs and guardrails. Guardrails? We still had fun on the road and it is still challenging and requires even more concentration then usual, but the moral of this adventure is: don’t judge a road by its nickname. Check out the time lapse video from our death road drive, above.


Animals of Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve, Ecuador

Best Amazon adventure destination in Ecuador: Ecuador is blessed with a number of different areas from which travelers can access the Amazon Basin. We spent weeks exploring the Amazon along the Napo River out of a town called Coca which is the most popular gateway. Then we visited the Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve in the Amazon Basin and it blew our minds. The waterways in the Cuyabeno area of Ecuador are much smaller and they flood and recede throughout the year. There are also far fewer lodging options in the Cuyabeno area then there are along the Napo which means fewer humans. This means the animals are more common and much easier to see. In three days we saw pink river dolphins, the smallest monkey in the world (the pygmy marmoset), huge tracts of primary rainforest, toucans, a pygmy potoo (look it up) and more. We saw so many animals we had to make a wildlife montage for you, above. Lodges in the Cuyabeno area of the Amazon Basin are fairly basic with varying degrees of electricity, hot water, etc. We recommend Tapir Lodge where the food is great, the solar and generator electricity is reliable and the private rooms are clean and comfortable. The biggest asset at Tapir Lodge is Kurt the owner. He is passionate about his slice of paradise and works hard to make sure his guests fall in love with it too.


Kuelap Fortress archaeological site - Chachapoyas, Peru

Best first Incan archaeological site: During the course of our Trans-Americas Journey we’ve explored more than 100 archaeological sites through the US, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. None of them have been Incan sites, however, until we crossed into Peru and headed straight for the Kuelap Fortress, which is actually a pre-Incan site that was built by the Chachapoyas people in 1500s. The massive stone wall that encloses this site is nearly 2,000 feet (600 meters) long by nearly 400 feet (119 meters) wide. In places the wall is 62 feet (19 meters) high (check it out, above). Kuelap held thousands of people at it’s peak in distinctive round stone houses with thatch roofs. Despite its name, some archaeologists believe that Kuelap probably wasn’t a fortress at all but more of a sacred area used for ceremonies and rituals. Visiting Keulap is about to get even more adventurous. In late 2015 work began on a massive cable car system, the first in Peru, which will transport visitors from the village of Tingo Nuevo to the Kuelap site covering 2.5 miles (4 km) and rising more than 2,400 feet (730 meters) in 20 minutes. The new Kuelap cable car is expected to be finished in 2017.

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Where to Drink in Bogotá Right Now – Bogotá, Colombia

The food scene in Bogotá is on fire (we tell you where to eat right now in our Bogotá Dining Guide) and the drinking and bar scene isn’t too far behind with craft beers, and lovingly made cocktails served in bars to suite anyone’s style. Our guide to watering holes in the Colombian capital will tell you where to drink in Bogotá right now.

Where to drink in Bogotá right now

Bar Enano – The Spanish word enano loosely translates to dwarf in English and everything about Bar Enano, off the main dining room at Bistro el Bandido (which nails the French Bistro vibe and menu – order the coq au vin), is small. The handful of tables are tiny. The menu offers small bites. The antique tableware, exquisitely sourced from antique shops and estate sales in Medellin, is almost doll size. The cocktails, on the other hand, pack a big, big punch. The throwback issues of Playboy magazine are the icing on the cake at this intimate, retro spot.

Bar Enano Bogota

Bar Enano, a new place to get a serious cocktail in an intimate space.

Black Bear – This place is so full of craft cocktails and the hipsters who love them that you may think you’ve teleported from Bogotá to Portland. There’s food here too but it’s the serious mixology that keeps this place packed.

Black Bear bar Bogota

At Black Bear it’s hard to tell who’s more serious about mixology: the bartenders or the patrons.

Bar 8 1/4  – This six stool watering hole is helmed by Ronnie Schneider, a Venezuelan who calls himself a “Slow Drink Tender”. Armed with a cabinet full of homemade infusions and bitters he experiments boldly, fails rarely and delights his patrons with classy (but never pretentious) presentation with surprises in every sip. Whatever you do, don’t order a boring old beer. Located at Carrera 14 #86A-12 on the first floor of a house that’s been turned into a culinary and retail space. You will need to be buzzed into the front door which just adds to the speakeasy vibe.

Bar 8 1/4 Bogoat

Ronnie Schneider works his magic at Bar 8 1/4.

Apache Burger Bar – Created and operated by Chef Felipe Arizabaleta of Bistro el Bandido, Bar Enano and Bruto fame, this place is a hip watering hole on the roof of the even hipper Click Clack Hotel. Casual, sexy and straightforward, you can get a beer, good wine or a cocktail while enjoying a DJ and epic views of the city below. Food (salads, sandwiches, Chicago style hot dogs and, of course, burgers) is also available.

Apache Burger Bar Bogota

Locals flock to Apache Burger Bar for rooftop views, a DJ and great drinks.

Bogotá Beer Company – Lovingly referred to as just “BBC”, this is the biggest little craft brewery in Colombia (in 2015 BBC was purchased by Ambev, the Brazilian affiliate of Anheuser-Busch Imbev, but nothing has changed on the ground). There are nearly 30 BBC pubs across Colombia where a range of craft beers on tap and in bottles can be enjoyed along with food and music. Happy hour prices are offered Monday to Friday between noon and 7 pm which means you can enjoy a pint of world-class craft beer for about US$2.25 including tax and tip. Really.

Bogota Beer Company

Bogotá Beer Company, the biggest little beer maker in Colombia.

Statua Rota – BBC is the big boy of Colombian craft beers, but there are many small producers doing good work as well. We recommend a visit to Statua Rota (Broken Statue) in the Chapinero neighborhood where a house has been converted into a brew pub that feels like a frat house but with better kegs. Two brothers and a friend started the brewery and despite their youth and heavy metal wardrobes they’re very serious about what they do. Their European style beers are solid and include a wheat beer brewed with lulo (a sweet/tart fruit) and coriander seeds and a bock beer called Michael Jackson because, according to the brew master, it has a white soul but it looks black. A grill in the courtyard turns out well-priced kebabs, sausages and burgers too.

Cerveceria La Estatua Rota Bogota

Serious beer in a frat house atmosphere at the Statua Rota brew pub.

Xarcuteria – The best happy hour in Bogotá, by far, is at Xarcuteria where cocktails are half price and wine and beer (including craft beer) is 30% off every day from 4:30 to 7:30 and again from 10:30 to closing time. Happy hour is not offered on Sundays, but you’ll need a day to recover anyway.

Gordo Brooklyn Bar & Restaurant –  Colombian chef Daniel Castaño worked with Mario Batali in New York City for nearly a decade. When he returned to Colombia to begin opening restaurants of his own he missed the bars he used to visit near his home in Brooklyn, so he created a Brooklyn bar in Bogotá. Unlike many places in the capital, the bar at Gordo is huge and inviting. There are couches and areas to simply hang out in. There’s even a pressed tin ceiling that came straight from Brooklyn. The bar tender is skilled, they make their own tonic water and vermouth and, if you’re lucky, Daniel might be on the bar stool next to you. The menu is fabulous too (including a burger made with a hand ground beef patty served on a homemade brioche bun), so come hungry. Read more about how Daniel created a Brooklyn bar in Bogotá in our piece about Gordo for TheLatinKitchen.com.

Gordo Brooklyn Bar & Restaurant Bogota

Gordo, a Brooklyn neighborhood bar in Bogotá.

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